Use this page to discuss issues related to installing Linux from or onto PCMCIA devices. This could include installation procedures for specific Linux distributions.

If you have already installed Linux and are having trouble configuring PCMCIA, then you should probably be in a different forum.

Note that problems encountered during a Linux installation can be particularly difficult to solve, because a typical install environment will not provide debugging tools or any way of reconfiguring PCMCIA. In some cases, the best option is to find another way of installing Linux that does not require PCMCIA; and then debug the PCMCIA problem if it persists.

Messages Inline: 0 1

Question Install fails with KXL-D740 CD onto VAIO 505TR (SUSE 6.2)

Date: 1999, Dec 11
From: Bruce Forsberg <forsberg@adnc.com>

I just purchased a Sony VAIO 505TR without the Sony CDROM.
I do have a PCMCIA Panasonic KXL-D740 CDROM that I would
like to use for the install. I know that I can't boot from
this so I boot from the boot disk of SUSE 6.2. Then specify
to load kernel modules. Load modules disk. Then it gives me
two screens to enter options. I press enter for these.
Then it tries to do the PCMCIA thing it hangs. 

I have been able with SUSE 6.2 and the same PCMCIA CDROM
to install on an old Sharp PC-8650 with no problems at all.

Here are the precise steps after loading boot disk and modules
disk.

1. GUI says Found PCMCIA chipset "i82365"!
   Please enter parameters for PCMCIA core modules

       I press enter

2. Please enter specific parameters for chipset "i82365"

       I press enter

3. Error message is display scrolling on top of install GUI

     cardmgr[23]: config error file 'config' line 1326 syntax
     error.

4. Then Kernel messages GUI pops up. It reads:
     cs: IO port probe 0x1000-0x17ff: clean
     cs: IO port probe 0x0100-0x04ff: excluding 0x140-0x147 0x170-0x177 0x[the rest not visible]
     d7
     cs: IO port probe 0x0a00-0x0aff: clean
     cs: memory probe 0xa0000000-0xa0ffffff: clean
     Q1: Using preset base address of 230
     Q1: Using preset IRQ 3
     scsi0 : Qlogicfas Driver version 0.46, chip 50 at 230, IRQ 3, TPdma:1
     scsi : 1 host
     scsi : aborting command due to timeout : pid 0, scsi0, channel 0, id

5. At this points it hangs and I have to start again.

6. Tried the same produre as above but typed into 1st GUI
      exclude irq=3
    GUI goes away then system hangs



What I do know so far from others.
   IRQ conflict. I need to exclude IRQ 3 and 5. I know how to
   do this from the config file but don't how from the SUSE
   install.


  The Sony VAIO 505TR is a killer laptop for linux if only I
  can get the CDROM working. I am a software developer and
  will most likely taking off and putting on new installations
  all the time so I would like to get this working. Any help
  would be appreciated.

Thanks.

None You can't use the config file style of exclusions, but...

Re: Question Install fails with KXL-D740 CD onto VAIO 505TR (SUSE 6.2) (Bruce Forsberg)
Date: 1999, Dec 12
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

On Sat, Dec 11, 1999 at 11:10:32AM -0800, Bruce Forsberg wrote:
> 
> 2. Please enter specific parameters for chipset "i82365"
> 
>        I press enter

You can limit interrupt selection here using the "irq_list" parameter
for the i82365 module.  Like "irq_list=9" to make irq 9 available.

-- Dave

Feedback More problems with KXL-D740 PCMCIA CDROM

Date: 1999, Dec 12
From: Bruce Forsberg <forsberg@adnc.com>

I was never able to install from the CDROM described in
the previous message. I went ahead and installed from a DOS
partition. I built a kernel (2.2.10) and download the
3.1.6 PCMCIA software. It recognizes the controller fine.
But when I insert the card aftter about 5-10 seconds the
system will hang. Below is the output from the /var/log/
messages file:

It looks like the driver is crashing or something. Sorry
for the length of this debug message.

Thanks for your time,

Bruce Forsberg



Dec 11 23:09:00 portable /usr/sbin/cron[165]: (CRON) STARTUP (fork ok) 
Dec 11 23:09:15 portable login: pam_unix session started for user root, service login 
Dec 11 23:09:27 portable kernel: Sound error: Couldn't allocate DMA buffer
Dec 11 23:16:21 portable cardmgr[68]: exiting
Dec 11 23:16:21 portable kernel: unloading PCMCIA Card Services
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel: Linux PCMCIA Card Services 3.1.6
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel:   kernel build: 2.2.10 #2 Sat Dec 11 23:00:10 PST 1999
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel:   options:  [pci] [cardbus]
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel: Intel PCIC probe: 
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel:   Ricoh RL5C475 PCI-to-CardBus at bus 0 slot 10, mem 0x68000000, 1 socket
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel:     host opts [0]: [isa irq] [io 3/6/1] [mem 3/6/1] [no pci irq] [lat 168/176] [bus 32/34]
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel:     ISA irqs (default) = 3,4,7,10,11,15 polling interval = 1000 ms
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable cardmgr[1020]: starting, version is 3.1.6
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable cardmgr[1020]: watching 1 sockets
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel: cs: IO port probe 0x1000-0x17ff: clean.
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel: cs: IO port probe 0x0100-0x04ff: excluding 0x140-0x147 0x170-0x177 0x370-0x37f 0x388-0x38f 0x4d0-0x4d7
Dec 11 23:16:27 portable kernel: cs: IO port probe 0x0a00-0x0aff: clean.
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: cs: memory probe 0xa0000000-0xa0ffffff: clean.
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable cardmgr[1020]: initializing socket 0
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable cardmgr[1020]: socket 0: Raven CD-Note SCSI
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable cardmgr[1020]: executing: 'insmod /lib/modules/2.2.10/pcmcia/qlogic_cs.o'
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Ql: Using preset base address of 230
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Ql: Using preset IRQ 10
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: scsi0 : Qlogicfas Driver version 0.46, chip 50 at 230, IRQ 10, TPdma:1
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: scsi : 1 host.
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: divide error: 0000
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: CPU:    0
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: EIP:    0010:[raid0_run+224/364]
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: EFLAGS: 00000282
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: eax: 00000000   ebx: c3b13744   ecx: c3b13744   edx: c01c0233
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: esi: 00000000   edi: c3b13750   ebp: c023ae00   esp: c3b136e4
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: ds: 0018   es: 0018   ss: 0018
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Process cardmgr (pid: 1020, process nr: 52, stackpage=c3b13000)
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Stack: 00000000 00000000 00000000 c020fd60 30000000 00000246 00000088 00000282 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        0023a000 c1b2c780 c009e200 c030f620 c011ec01 c009e080 00000246 c009e208 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        c3b13750 0009e208 00000286 c0dbd340 00000246 00000003 00000008 00000000 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Call Trace: [head_vals.663+9611/14031] [sys_mprotect+29/328] [create_strip_zones+223/516] [i82365+65230424/95469568] [do_fork+982/1856] [i82365+65230933/95469568] [head_vals.663+9611/14031] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [head_vals.663+9611/14031] [do_debug+147/180] [IRQ0x08_interrupt+4/8] [rw_intr+795/1396] [i82365+65230933/95469568] [rw_intr+795/1396] [i82365+65230424/95469568] [rw_intr+872/1396] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [tvecs+33164/39432] [do_fork+982/1856] [i82365+65230424/95469568] [compute_block+15/192] [handle_stripe+510/2236] [i82365+65230424/95469568] [i82365+65224669/95469568] [i82365+65230424/95469568] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [i82365+65225432/95469568] [i82365+65215590/95469568] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-71114/272] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-69957/272] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-70520/272] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-74566/272] [call_receive+44/100] [call_bind+4/40] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [xprt_transmit+850/1120] [i82365+65225586/95469568] [i82365+65225432/95469568] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-79963/272] [schedule+575/632] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-6591/272] [i82365+65215410/95469568] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-74198/272] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [i82365+65223940/95469568] [i82365+65230552/95469568] [i82365+65225432/95469568] [ds:register_pccard_driver+-73735/272] [i82365+65204128/95469568] [i82365+65206561/95469568] [UMSDOS_rmdir+153/332] [umsdos_rename_f+555/744] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [sys_rt_sigqueueinfo+38/200] [sys_rt_sigaction+79/348] [UMSDOS_link+967/1008] [tcp_rcv_established+313/1452] [prune_queue+0/260] [umsdos_setup_dir+60/76] [UMSDOS_ioctl_dir+1259/2308] [UMSDOS_ioctl_dir+1275/2308] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel:        [remap_page_range+187/632] [new_page_tables+114/168] [zap_page_range+325/452] [put_write_access+9/12] [do_signal+112/748] 
Dec 11 23:18:37 portable kernel: Code: ff 49 00 0f 88 39 93 02 00 c7 85 b4 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 8b 
Dec 11 23:18:43 portable kernel: scsi : aborting command due to timeout : pid 0, scsi0, channel 0, id 0, lun 0 Test Unit Ready 00 00 00 00 00 
Dec 11 23:22:40 portable syslogd 1.3-3: restart.
Dec 11 23:22:41 portable kernel: klogd 1.3-3, log source = /proc/kmsg started.
Dec 11 23:22:41 portable kernel: Inspecting /boot/System.map

Feedback RE: More problems (SOLVED)

Re: Feedback More problems with KXL-D740 PCMCIA CDROM (Bruce Forsberg)
Date: 1999, Dec 12
From: Bruce Forsberg <forsberg@adnc.com>

I have finally got my Panasonic KXL-D740 working. I got it
working by specifying a qlogics low level driver in the
kernel. I thought I would only need to specify SCSI support
and SCSI cdrom support. I did not realize that I needed to
specify a low level driver. I still have not figured out
hot to install with this CDROM but at least I can do a 
minimum install and then install the reset via cdrom. I will
see if SUSE will help me with the install part.

Bruce Forsberg

None That's very odd

Re: Feedback RE: More problems (SOLVED) (Bruce Forsberg)
Date: 1999, Dec 13
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

You shouldn't need to link the qlogic driver into the kernel; in fact,
it should not do any good, and I have no idea why it seems to help.

-- Dave

Note RE: That's very odd

Re: None That's very odd (David Hinds)
Date: 1999, Dec 14
From: Bruce Forsberg <forsberg@adnc.com>

You were right. Sorry for the misinformation. I changed too
many things at once. It turns out that when I build the 
pcmcia sotware with PnP BIOS resource checking to yes then
eveything works. If it is set to no then it does not work.
With it set to no then I need to set the following:

irq_list=11,15

and

exclude port 0x230-0x23f

With these selected it uses 0xa30. This is what it picks with
PnP BIOS set to yes as well.

Using these makes the following work:

Sony VAIO 505TR laptop. 

You can add these to the PCMCIA_HOW_TO if you like.

I am still trying to get it to install with it though. You
told me how to set irq_list. How do I exclude a port range
during the install?

Thanks,
Bruce Forsberg

BTW, if you work for VALINUX congrats on the IPO.

Question Bridging support and PCMCIA

Date: 2000, Jan 16
From: Jeremy Cook jeremyc

Hi,

I was wondering if there was any reason why bridging should not work with PCMCIA cards. I am using my old laptop as a home server and need it to do bridging (between wireless and fixed networks). I followed the bridging howto and everything seems to "almost work" without actually bridging between my 2 PC-card ethernet interfaces. The bridging howto said something about telling the kernel that I have more than one ethernet interface for it to discover during boot, which I did do, but since I dont fully understand what I am doing here it is unclear to me whether this would help with PC-card ethernet interfaces since they would not be available until quite late in the boot process.

Does anyone have bridging working with PC-card ethernet? If so, is there any big secret?

I have kernel 2.2.14 and pcmcia v 3.1.8

Best regards,

Jeremy Cook

None It should work

Re: Question Bridging support and PCMCIA (Jeremy Cook)
Date: 2000, Jan 18
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

There is no reason why bridging should not work for PCMCIA cards.  I
personally have not done it, but I have had reports from people who do
this.  It might be worth posting a question to a Linux networking
newsgroup; if you can verify that both of your network cards are
working (you can ping things on each network), and it is just the
bridging that isn't working, it sounds like it isn't a PCMCIA issue.

-- Dave

Note I'll try harder...

Re: None It should work (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Jan 18
From: Jeremy Cook jeremyc

Ok, I'll try harder. If anyone has bridging working with PC-cards though, then please get in touch, thanks.

Jeremy

Question problem to boot from PCMCIA scsi disk

Date: 2000, Feb 03
From: Marcel van Heemst vanheemst

I have installed linux on a PCMCIA scsi disk. But after installation i can't boot from this disk because linux loads his pcmcia driver later. So i will make a mkinitrd image to have pcmcia support at boottime. Can somebody tell me how i can make this image?

None See 'man pcinitrd' and the PCMCIA-HOWTO

Re: Question problem to boot from PCMCIA scsi disk (Marcel van Heemst)
Date: 2000, Feb 03
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

For PCMCIA initrd images, there is a special version of mkinitrd,
called pcinitrd, that does most of the work for you.  There is also a
section in the PCMCIA-HOWTO specifically about this.

-- Dave

Note I have found a note!

Re: None See 'man pcinitrd' and the PCMCIA-HOWTO (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Feb 04
From: Marcel van Heemst vanheemst

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

5. Advanced topics

5.1 Resource allocation for PCMCIA devices In theory, it should not really matter which interrupt is allocated to which device, as long as two devices are not configured to use the same interrupt. In /etc/pcmcia/config.opts you'll find a place for excluding interrupts that are used by non-PCMCIA devices.

Similarly, there is no way to directly specify the I/O addresses for a card to use. The /etc/pcmcia/config.opts file allows you to specify ranges of ports available for use by any card, or to exclude ranges that conflict with other devices.

After modifying /etc/pcmcia/config.opts, you can reinitialize cardmgr with ``kill -HUP''.

The interrupt used to monitor card status changes is chosen by the low-level socket driver module (i82365 or tcic) before cardmgr parses /etc/pcmcia/config, so it is not affected by changes to this file. To set this interrupt, use the cs_irq= option when the socket driver is loaded, by setting the PCIC_OPTS variable in /etc/rc.d/rc.pcmcia.

All the client card drivers have a parameter called irq_list for specifying which interrupts they may try to allocate. These driver options should be set in your /etc/pcmcia/config file. For example:

device "serial_cs"
  module "serial_cs" opts "irq_list=8,12"
  ...
would specify that the serial driver should only use irq 8 or irq 12. Regardless of irq_list settings, Card Services will never allocate an interrupt that is already in use by another device, or an interrupt that is excluded in the config file. 

5.2 How can I have separate device setups for home and work? This is fairly easy using ``scheme'' support. Use two configuration schemes, called ``home'' and ``work''. Here is an example of a network.opts script with scheme-specific settings:

case "$ADDRESS" in
work,*,*,*)
    # definitions for network card in work scheme
    ...
    ;;
home,*,*,*|default,*,*,*)
    # definitions for network card in home scheme
    ...
    ;;
esac
The first part of a device address is always the configuration scheme. In this example, the second ``case'' clause will select for both the ``home'' and ``default'' schemes. So, if the scheme is unset for any reason, it will default to the ``home'' setup. 

Now, to select between the two sets of settings, run either:

cardctl scheme home or

cardctl scheme work The cardctl command does the equivalent of shutting down all your cards and restarting them. The command can be safely executed whether or not the PCMCIA system is loaded, but the command may fail if you are using other PCMCIA devices at the time (even if their configurations are not explicitly dependant on the scheme setting).

To find out the current scheme setting, run:

cardctl scheme By default, the scheme setting is persistent across boots. This can have undesirable effects if networking is initialized for the wrong environment. Optionally, you can set the initial scheme value with the SCHEME startup option (see Startup options for details). It is also possible to set the scheme from the lilo boot prompt. Since lilo passes unrecognized options to init as environment variables, a value for SCHEME (or any other PCMCIA startup option) at the boot prompt will be propagated into the PCMCIA startup script.

To save even more keystrokes, schemes can be specified in lilo's configuration file. For instance, you could have:

root = /dev/hda1
read-only
image = /boot/vmlinuz
  label  = home
  append = "SCHEME=home"
image = /boot/vmlinuz
  label  = work
  append = "SCHEME=work"
Typing ``home'' or ``work'' at the boot prompt would then boot into the appropriate scheme. 

5.3 Booting from a PCMCIA device

Having the root filesystem on a PCMCIA device is tricky because the Linux PCMCIA system is not designed to be linked into the kernel. Its core components, the loadable kernel modules and the user mode cardmgr daemon, depend on an already running system. The kernel's ``initrd'' facility works around this requirement by allowing Linux to boot using a temporary ram disk as a minimal root image, load drivers, and then re-mount a different root filesystem. The temporary root can configure PCMCIA devices and then re-mount a PCMCIA device as root.

The initrd image absolutely must reside on a bootable device: this generally cannot be put on a PCMCIA device. This is a BIOS limitation, not a kernel limitation. It is useful here to distinguish between ``boot-able'' devices (i.e., devices that can be booted), and ``root-able'' devices (i.e., devices that can be mounted as root). ``Boot-able'' devices are determined by the BIOS, and are generally limited to internal floppy and hard disk drives. ``Root-able'' devices are any block devices that the kernel supports once it has been loaded. The initrd facility makes more devices ``root-able'', not ``boot-able''.

Some Linux distributions will allow installation to a device connected to a PCMCIA SCSI adapter, as an unintended side-effect of their support for installs from PCMCIA SCSI CD-ROM devices. However, at present, no Linux installation tools support configuring an appropriate ``initrd'' to boot Linux with a PCMCIA root filesystem. Setting up a system with a PCMCIA root thus requires that you use another Linux system to create the ``initrd'' image. If another Linux system is not available, another option would be to temporarily install a minimal Linux setup on a non-PCMCIA drive, create an initrd image, and then reinstall to the PCMCIA target.

The Linux Bootdisk-HOWTO has some general information about setting up boot disks but nothing specific to initrd. The main initrd document is included with recent kernel source code distributions, in linux/Documentation/initrd.txt. Before beginning, you should read this document. A familiarity with lilo is also helpful. Using initrd also requires that you have a kernel compiled with CONFIG_BLK_DEV_RAM and CONFIG_BLK_DEV_INITRD enabled.

This is an advanced configuration technique, and requires a high level of familiarity with Linux and the PCMCIA system. Be sure to read all the relevant documentation before starting. The following cookbook instructions should work, but deviations from the examples will quickly put you in uncharted and ``unsupported'' territory, and you will be on your own.

This method absolutely requires that you use a PCMCIA driver release of 2.9.5 or later. Older PCMCIA packages or individual components will not work in the initrd context. Do not mix components from different releases.

The pcinitrd helper script The pcinitrd script creates a basic initrd image for booting with a PCMCIA root partition. The image includes a minimal directory heirarchy, a handful of device files, a few binaries, shared libraries, and a set of PCMCIA driver modules. When invoking pcinitrd, you specify the driver modules that you want to be included in the image. The core PCMCIA components, pcmcia_core and ds, are automatically included.

As an example, say that your laptop uses an i82365-compatible host controller, and you want to boot Linux with the root filesystem on a hard drive attached to an Adaptec SlimSCSI adapter. You could create an appropriate initrd image with:

pcinitrd -v initrd pcmcia/i82365.o pcmcia/aha152x_cs.o To customize the initrd startup sequence, you could mount the image using the ``loopback'' device with a command like:

mount -o loop -t ext2 initrd /mnt and then edit the linuxrc script. The configuration files will be installed under /etc in the image, and can also be customized. See the man page for pcinitrd for more information.

Creating an initrd boot floppy

After creating an image with pcinitrd, you can create a boot floppy by copying the kernel, the compressed initrd image, and a few support files for lilo to a clean floppy. In the following example, we assume that the desired PCMCIA root device is /dev/sda1:

mke2fs /dev/fd0 mount /dev/fd0 /mnt mkdir /mnt/etc /mnt/boot /mnt/dev cp -a /dev/fd0 /dev/sda1 /mnt/dev cp [kernel-image] /mnt/vmlinuz cp /boot/boot.b /mnt/boot/boot.b gzip < [initrd-image] > /mnt/initrd Create /mnt/etc/lilo.conf with the contents:

boot=/dev/fd0
compact
image=/vmlinuz
    label=linux
    initrd=/initrd
    read-only
    root=/dev/sda1
Finally, invoke lilo with: 

lilo -r /mnt When lilo is invoked with -r, it performs all actions relative to the specified alternate root directory. The reason for creating the device files under /mnt/dev was that lilo will not be able to use the files in /dev when it is running in this alternate-root mode.

Installing an initrd image on a non-Linux drive One common use of the initrd facility would be on systems where the internal hard drive is dedicated to another operating system. The Linux kernel and initrd image can be placed in a non-Linux partition, and lilo or LOADLIN can be set up to boot Linux from these images.

Assuming that you have a kernel has been configured for the appropriate root device, and an initrd image created on another system, the easiest way to get started is to boot Linux using LOADLIN, as:

LOADLIN <kernel> initrd=<initrd-image> Once you can boot Linux on your target machine, you could then install lilo to allow booting Linux directly. For example, say that /dev/hda1 is the non-Linux target partition and /mnt can be used as a mount point. First, create a subdirectory on the target for the Linux files:

mount /dev/hda1 /mnt mkdir /mnt/linux cp [kernel-image] /mnt/linux/vmlinuz cp [initrd-image] /mnt/linux/initrd In this example, say that /dev/sda1 is the desired Linux root partition, a SCSI hard drive mounted via a PCMCIA SCSI adapter. To install lilo, create a lilo.conf file with the contents:

boot=/dev/hda
map=/mnt/linux/map
compact
image=/mnt/linux/vmlinuz
        label=linux
        root=/dev/sda1
        initrd=/mnt/linux/initrd
        read-only
other=/dev/hda1
        table=/dev/hda
        label=windows
The boot= line says to install the boot loader in the master boot record of the specified device. The root= line identifies the desired root filesystem to be used after loading the initrd image, and may be unnecessary if the kernel image is already configured this way. The other= section is used to describe the other operating system installed on /dev/hda1. 

To install lilo in this case, use:

lilo -C lilo.conf Note that in this case, the lilo.conf file uses absolute paths that include /mnt. I did this in the example because the target filesystem may not support the creation of Linux device files for the boot= and root= options.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Question More questions about this topics

Re: Note I have found a note! (Marcel van Heemst)
Date: 2000, Mar 18
From: Leonardo Presciuttini leoprex

I have installed TurboLinux 6.0 on an external IDE hard disk with PCMCIA interface (brand: 'Kangourou disk') and got the same problem: at the first boot the Linux partition cannot be seen because the PCMCIA driver is not still loaded.

I understand that the problem can be solved following the instructions of chapt.5.3 of the PCMCIA-HOWTO, but they are not understatable to me: I do not know anything about Linux.

In particular I cannot understand how I can pass commands to Linux such as pcinitrd when Linux OS is not running.

Could an expert write down step-by-step instructions for non-specialists?

Gratefully,
Leonardo Presciuttini

None It is not simple, unfortunately

Re: Question More questions about this topics (Leonardo Presciuttini)
Date: 2000, Mar 20
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

The instructions in the HOWTO were meant to be as step-by-step as I
could manage.  However, this is clearly described as an advanced
procedure.  You cannot do it unless you have access to another linux
system that you can use to create the initrd boot image.  And you
should not try to do it if you are new to linux.

So... the short answer would be "sorry, you just can't do this".

-- Dave

Idea I appreciate it is hard for a neophite, but.....

Re: None It is not simple, unfortunately (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Mar 21
From: Leonardo Presciuttini leoprex

Effectively I am completely new of Linux. But I have also a hard head. So I have tried the following:

1) I have downloaded the muLinux project from http://mulinux.firenze.linux.it . As you may know better than me, this is an operating system which can be completely loaded in the RAM.

2) The idea is to mount the PCMCIA support with muLinux and then switch to the big Linux that I have already installed on the external drive. The programmer of muLinux has even added the instructions for such an operation.

3) All goes well with the launch of muLinux. Nevertheless I have some problems in mounting the floppy disk (with fs ext2, created with a big Linux installation CD) containing pcmcia.img. In effect I got a message thet the fs is not checked and that it is recomended to run ex2fsck (which I did not find). Moreover (somewhat randomly), sometimes I can get access to the disk, reading the names of the files contained in it, and somtimes no. With DOS disks I have no problems.

4) The programmer of muLinux has foreseen to ask to the user during boot if he wants to use some of a lot of devices/functionalities. But unfotunately he did not include PCMCIA in this.

5) So I must load the PCMCIA functionality manually, but I do not know which is the right way (perhaps 'setup -m pcmcia.img' ?). In any case I should solve before the problem nb.3

This is the actual state of my efforts.

Do you think that some hints to allow me to continue my adventure in Linux can be done?

Thank you

Leonardo

Question pcmcia intall hangs

Date: 2000, Feb 14
From: Jon Page <jon.page@pnl.gov>

I am trying to setup a laptop to dual-boot Win98 and Linux 6.1.

I have created the pcmcia boot floppy but the install hangs early on when initializing the PC card devices.

This laptop is a Compaq Armada 7750MT and has a 3Com etherlink III 3c589D in slot 2 and a Megahertz 33.6 modem in slot one. It also has a built in 28.8 modem.

I have tried this several times, with both cards in and with only the NIC in but I still have the same problem.

Any help would be appreciated.

Jon Page jon.page@pnl.gov

None PCMCIA installs are basically un-debuggable

Re: Question pcmcia intall hangs (Jon Page)
Date: 2000, Feb 14
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

Find another way to install that doesn't require using a PCMCIA
device.  There is no good way to debug this.

-- Dave

Question Installing Redhat 6.1 on a Toshiba

Date: 2000, Feb 15
From: Steve Thomas <stevet@sb.net>

I have a Toshiba 110CS with 40 Meg and a new, unformatted 4Gig HD. I also have an external panasonic KXL-D720 SCSI CD ROM where I would like to install from. I'm using the Redhat pcmcia boot disk. However, after initial boot, it asks me for a drivers disk.

I understand that the qlogic driver works with this device. How do I prepare a drivers disk with the requisite drivers? I'm new to this stuff and have been searching the net for hours. I have a qlogic_c.c file on my CD.

Thanks,

Steve

More Drivers Disk

Re: Question Installing Redhat 6.1 on a Toshiba (Steve Thomas)
Date: 2000, Feb 17
From: Steve Thomas <stevet@sb.net>

Updated info. I prepared a new drivers disk with the gdth-drivers-disk.img from Redhat. When the system asks for a drivers disk,I insert this one. It takes it just fine, but I still run into a dead end. I can't get past the point where it says that I have no hard disk.

Ideas anyone?

Steve

None Re: More: Drivers Disk

Re: More Drivers Disk (Steve Thomas)
Date: 2000, Feb 19
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

I think this is more of a Red Hat problem than a PCMCIA problem...

I checked their bug tracker, and found a similar report, and Red Hat
says that you should just hit "cancel" when asked for a driver disk.
They're asking for a driver disk for the drive you're installing to,
not the PCMCIA CD-ROM.  And you don't need a driver disk for your hard
drive.

Can you try that, and post your results?  I think the gdth-driver-disk
is definitely not something you should be using.

-- Dave

More Drivers Disk

Re: None Re: More: Drivers Disk (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Feb 19
From: Steve Thomas <stevet@sb.net>

The driver disk did nothing, either way. I have been totally unable to get RH to recognize my CD. So, after admitting defeat, I decided to partition the hard drive with a fat32 partition big enough to hold the entire CD. That being done, I tried again installing RH 6.1.

This time, I was able to get a lot farther along in the installation. It was able to find the CD contents on my HD just fine. So, I proceeded. Then, after specifying root password, user id and password, and so forth, it started cranking with the install. Then, it failed with the following message:

"/tmp/lib/python1.5/site-packages/comps.py", line 50, in __init__
     name = h[rpm.RPMTAG_NAME]
TypeError: unsubscriptable object

I know that this is not in the PCMCIA realm. But, if I ever get this thing loaded, I'll be back! I found, however, that there is a zero byte file in that directory. I'm following-up. What a pain!

Steve

Question Installing using OvisLink ether. Pcmcia

Date: 2000, Feb 20
From: Adam tqm

I am having trouble installing redhat using a OvisLink PCMCIA network card. I have no CDROM drive therefore I need to use the network. My card (OvisLink), is supported according to the list (http://pcmcia.sourceforge.org/ftp/SUPPORTED.CARDS) however it is not supported in the pcmcia.img file.

What can I do? Is there a boot image with my card supported?

Help with this would be much appreciated.

Thanks

None You may be out of luck

Re: Question Installing using OvisLink ether. Pcmcia (Adam)
Date: 2000, Feb 23
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

> What can I do? Is there a boot image with my card supported?

Not unless Red Hat decides to create one for you.

Your best bet is to find another way to install, or maybe borrow
another card that works.  There aren't a lot of ways to debug this
sort of thing.

-- Dave

Angry Can't use TI1225 PCI (Lucent) PCi-to-PCMCIA adapter

Date: 2000, Mar 11
From: Tommy Svensson tommy23

Hi!

I am trying to setup a Linux box with some PCMCIA adapters (Wavelan).

I have setup a couple of box like those with Wavelan PCMCIA adapters and even diffrent PCMCIA network card. Always working just fine.

Before I always use ISA PCMCIA adapters, often Cirus or VIA chips based.

This week I got some PCI-to-PCMCIA adapter from lucent which is based on the TI1225 card. I think the Lucent PCI-to-PCMCIA bridge is OEm version of SCM Microsytems GMBH (This name is printed on the card).

But I can't get it to work. I have tested it in arround 10 diffrent system. And I always get two kind of error.

1) Even the BIOS can't find the PCI card 2) Bios, Linux find two PCI card on the sam PCI bus.

In case 1) pcmcia fail complete then you run /etc/init.d/pcmcia

In case 2) The pcmcia core system and i82536 drivers load, and it finds two WaveLAN cards or two 3com networks card even if I only put in one... And it is a on chips cards.

I think perhaps the cards i crashed and I should for a replace ment card.

Some who know more about this?

I think of test with at diffrent PCI-to-PCMCIA bridge like one based on the VIa or Cirus chips which always have work fine with me before at least at ISA based.

Or do I need to do something diffrent because I use a PCI bridge instand of a ISA bridge? But I don't think so, i have never had so much trouble with a PCI card before. And I also think it is very strange you on diffrent computer the computer bios/linux either can't detect the PCI card or they detect two/double PCI card?

Please help me!

Kind regards!

//Tommy

Please email me to tommy_skovde@hotmail.com

None It has to be a basic linux PCI problem

Re: Angry Can't use TI1225 PCI (Lucent) PCi-to-PCMCIA adapter (Tommy Svensson)
Date: 2000, Mar 13
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

Both of these problems sound like problems in the Linux PCI driver
code, not the PCMCIA code.  Martin Mares at mj@ucw.cz is the best
person to ask, since he is the PCI maintainer.  Can you send me your
/proc/pci output in the second case (where the device shows up twice)?
I think the drivers should have been able to figure out that one.

-- Dave

None RedHat 6.1 Install using PC Card - arg!

Date: 2000, Mar 18
From: Lionel B. Dyck lbdyck

I have a IBM Thinkpad 701C, 24mb ram, 340mb hd, and both a Cadmusmicro 10/100 Ethernet PC Card (lna100n) and and IBM PCMCIA 4x CDROM (1969-008) using redhat 6.1 pcmcia.img diskette.

Apparently neither are found when I attempt my install. With the CDROM the "Initializing PC Card" popup appears and then a popup asking for a driver diskette. However the CDROM drive spins the CD during the initialization so it appears to be finding it but something isn't right.

For the ethernet card I see the same only there is no indication that the card was found - only the prompt for the driver diskette. With this card I found in the manual the following:

** Getting Started for RedHat 6.0 with PCMCIA-3.0.9 
* Login as root.
* Copy lnax100.o into /lib/modules/2.2.5 -"cp lnax100.o /lib/modules/2.2.5"
* Copy config.lna100n into /etc/pcmcia - "cp config.lna100n /etc/pcmcia"
* Use vi editor to append the following line into /etc/pcmcia/config - source ./config.lna100n
* Restart the cardmgr - "/etc/rc.d/init.d/pcmcia restart"
* Logoff root. 

But I can't find the lnax100.o or config.lna100n nor do I know how to update the pcmcia.img generated diskette.

Help (please)

Feedback Automatic probing of PCMCIA during installation

Re: None RedHat 6.1 Install using PC Card - arg! (Lionel B. Dyck)
Date: 2000, Mar 19
From: Leonardo Presciuttini leoprex

I have a Toshiba 300CDT and both Sportster Winmodem PC card and a external IDE disk drive card. I have tried 6 among the major installations, but the only two which recognized the existence of PC cards during istallation (and so they asked if I need support for PCMCIA) were SuSE and TurboLinux. RedHat did not asked. Both SuSE and TurboLinux, after loading the extra-disk, recognised the external drive and so I can partition and format the external disk, but did not recognised the modem card. Since I have not succeded to arrive at the end of the first boot (see question nb.4 on this forum) I cannot say if it will be possible to recognise the modem after launching Linux. Perhaps it can be of help to you to try with the abovesaid installations. Leonardo

None Those cards are not supported

Re: None RedHat 6.1 Install using PC Card - arg! (Lionel B. Dyck)
Date: 2000, Mar 20
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

These two cards (Cadmus Micro 10/100 ethernet, IBM 4x CDROM) are
not on the supported cards list.  You're going to have a very
difficult time trying to modify the Red Hat installation disks to
support them.  There's no easy way to do it.

I'm not sure what the specific problem is with the CDROM card.  Part
of the problem with PCMCIA installations is that there is no space on
the install disks to put things to help diagnose problems.  And
without more information, it isn't possible to tell exactly what is
wrong, or to fix anything.

Your best bet is to buy or borrow a card that Red Hat says is actually
supposed to work with RH6.0.  Even still, PCMCIA installation is often
problematic, which is why Red Hat will tell you they don't officially
support it at all.

-- Dave

Sad Support for Cadmus card ??

Re: None Those cards are not supported (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Mar 20
From: Lionel B. Dyck lbdyck

Thanks for you response. I kept looking and I found this on the ethernet card vendors web site:

Getting Started for RedHat 6.0 with PCMCIA-3.0.9

* Login as root.
* Copy lnax100.o into /lib/modules/2.2.5 -"cp lnax100.o /lib/modules/2.2.5"
* Copy config.lna100n into /etc/pcmcia - "cp config.lna100n /etc/pcmcia"
* Use vi editor to append the following line into /etc/pcmcia/config -
source ./config.lna100n
* Restart the cardmgr - "/etc/rc.d/init.d/pcmcia restart"
* Logoff root.

If I can do this then perhaps I can do the ftp install. But how do I change the pcmcia.img diskette?

I've send them a e-mail asking where to find these files as they are not on their driver diskette that came with the card.

None Those instructions don't apply in this case

Re: None Those cards are not supported (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Mar 20
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

I saw those instructions, and they do not help in your situation.  You
can't easily edit the pcmcia.img diskette to add this driver, because
the install disk contains a compressed linux filesystem image.

-- Dave

Sad Can't win - sigh

Re: None Those instructions don't apply in this case (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Mar 21
From: Lionel B. Dyck lbdyck

Seems I can't win on this one - thanks for your thoughtful assistance.

Question Using PCMCIA with Kernel v2.3.99-pre6

Date: 2000, May 03
From: David Stephenson stugs

I am installing the PCMCIA modules on my Toshiba Portege 3020CT. After my inital install of Debian, it found my network and modem cards. Since it was supported, I decided to upgrade to a 2.3.x kernel. I installed the kernel and then installed the latest PCMCIA package. When I boot the machine I get the following:

<snip>
Linux PCMCIA Card Services 3.1.11
  kernel build: 2.3.99-pre6 #8 Wed May 3 14:50:31 EST 2000
  options:  [pci] [cardbus]
Intel PCIC Probe: not found
ds: no socket drivers loaded!
<snip>

Once I get to the login promt and check the modules, I see that only the pcmcia_core module is loaded. I am then unable to load any of the other modules by hand.

If I reboot back into a 2.2.x kernel, the modules all load fine.

Any ideas?

None Socket driver selection issue

Re: Question Using PCMCIA with Kernel v2.3.99-pre6 (David Stephenson)
Date: 2000, May 03
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

In the 2.3.* kernel, the i82365 driver module only supports ISA bus
PCMCIA bridges.  You need to disable that, and enable the CardBus
socket driver.  Instead of loading the i82365 module, you'll need to
load the yenta and pci_socket modules.

-- Dave

Feedback How to find not recognized Xircom-Card!

Re: Question Using PCMCIA with Kernel v2.3.99-pre6 (David Stephenson)
Date: 2000, Jul 23
From: Juergen Rose jrrose

Hello,

my Xircom card was not recognized, when I used the PCMCIA driver in 2.3.99 and 2.4.0-test1 kernels. So I disabled everything connected with PCMCIA in the kernel and used the external PCMCIA-Package 3.1.14-19. I think the PCMCIA-driver in the kernel are too old (3.1.11). Perhaps this helps also in your Problem.
  Juergen

Note compilation problems with pcmcia-cs-3.1.19 and linux-2.4.0-test4

Date: 2000, Jul 23
From: Juergen Rose jrrose

Compilation of pcmcia-cs-3.1.19 stops with:


cc   -MD -O3 -Wall -Wstrict-prototypes -pipe -I../include -I/usr/src/linux/include  -D__KERNEL__ -DMODULE -c ray_cs.c
In file included from ray_cs.c:68:
ray_cs.h:54: field `stats' has incomplete type
ray_cs.c: In function `ray_get_stats':
ray_cs.c:1956: warning: control reaches end of non-void function
make[1]: *** [ray_cs.o] Error 1

Compilation of pcmcia-cs-3.1.18 stops with a similar error in 
xirc2ps_cs.c. It seems me, that the error is caused by the use
of struct enet_statistics, which is not defined in the headers
 
of the new kernel. The error can be removed by the following patch.
 
--- pcmcia-cs-3.1.19/wireless/ray_cs.h	Wed Apr  5 01:14:19 2000
+++ pcmcia-cs-3.1.19_patched/wireless/ray_cs.h	Sun Jul 23 13:49:51 2000
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@
     UCHAR auth_id[6];
     UCHAR net_default_tx_rate;
     UCHAR encryption;
-    struct enet_statistics stats;
+    struct net_device_stats stats;
 
     UCHAR net_type;
     UCHAR sta_type;

With best regards
	Juergen

None Already fixed

Re: Note compilation problems with pcmcia-cs-3.1.19 and linux-2.4.0-test4 (Juergen Rose)
Date: 2000, Jul 24
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

This is fixed in the current beta.

-- Dave

Question Bug: Lockups on card insertion/removal...

Date: 2000, Aug 03
From: Elliot Lee sopwith

Hardware: Casio Fiva MPC-501

Software: kernel-2.2.16-17, pcmcia-cs-3.1.19 (from Red Hat pinstripe beta).

Symptoms: When I remove or insert cards, the system locks up hard. I did manage to remove a 3c589 network card, but inserting it, or inserting/removing a WaveLAN/IEEE card or CD-ROM interface card, causes the described lockup.

I saw a problem report in another thread that said having a syslog such as the following was a Bad Thing(tm):
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel: Linux PCMCIA Card Services 3.1.19
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:   kernel build: 2.2.16-17 #1 Wed Jul 26 15:04:58 EDT 2000
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:   options:  [pci] [cardbus] [apm]
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel: PCI routing table version 1.0 at 0xfdfa0
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:   unknown PCI interrupt router 1078:0001
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel: Intel PCIC probe: 
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:   Ricoh RL5C475 rev 00 PCI-to-CardBus at slot 00:01, mem 0x68000000
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:     host opts [0]: [isa irq] [io 3/6/1] [mem 3/6/1] [no pci irq] [lat 168/176] [bus 32/34]
Aug  2 21:16:21 anode kernel:     ISA irqs (default) = 3,4,7,9,10,11,12 polling interval = 1000 ms
Aug  2 21:16:22 anode pcmcia:  cardmgr.

Please let me know what details I can provide to help narrow down the problem...

None More information?

Re: Question Bug: Lockups on card insertion/removal... (Elliot Lee)
Date: 2000, Aug 03
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

Can you post the output of "lspci" or /proc/pci, and the output of the
"dump_pirq" script from the debug-tools directory of the PCMCIA source
tree?

-- Dave

None More Fiva info

Re: None More information? (David Hinds)
Date: 2000, Aug 03
From: Elliot Lee sopwith

Output of lspci -v:
00:00.0 Host bridge: Cyrix Corporation PCI Master
	Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0

00:01.0 CardBus bridge: Ricoh Co Ltd RL5c475
	Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 168
	Memory at <ignored> (32-bit, non-prefetchable)
	Bus: primary=00, secondary=20, subordinate=22, sec-latency=176
	I/O window 0: 00000000-00000003
	I/O window 1: 00000000-00000003
	16-bit legacy interface ports at 0001

00:12.0 ISA bridge: Cyrix Corporation 5520 [Cognac]
	Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 0
	I/O ports at 3000
	I/O ports at 4000
	I/O ports at 5000
	Memory at 40010000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

00:13.0 USB Controller: Compaq Computer Corporation USB Open Host Controller (rev 04) (prog-if 10 [OHCI])
	Subsystem: Compaq Computer Corporation USB Open Host Controller
	Flags: bus master, medium devsel, latency 64, IRQ 15
	Memory at e0000000 (32-bit, non-prefetchable)

dump_pirq output:
Interrupt routing table found at address 0xfdfa0:
  Version 1.0, size 0x0030
  Interrupt router is device 00:00.0
  PCI exclusive interrupt mask: 0x8000

Device 00:01.0 (slot 1):
  INTA: link 0x01, irq mask 0xdeb8
  INTB: link 0x02, irq mask 0xdeb8
  INTC: link 0x03, irq mask 0xdeb8
  INTD: link 0x04, irq mask 0xdeb8

Interrupt router at 00:00.0: unknown vendor 0x1078 device 0x0001

Ok Resolved

Re: None More Fiva info (Elliot Lee)
Date: 2000, Aug 03
From: Elliot Lee sopwith

David sent me a solution in private e-mail which worked, so I wanted to post here in case others ever had the same problem.

Add "pci_irq_list=15" to PCIC_OPTS in /etc/sysconfig/pcmcia or equivalent.

I thank David for his quick and helpful responses. Now if I can just fix my code, I might be able to offer him a demo at LWCE :)

Thanks again...

Question linux-2.4.0-test6, Xircom and i82365

Date: 2000, Aug 16
From: Juergen Rose jrrose

My Xircom Cardbus Adapter CBE which worked properly with older linux versions is not recognized with linux-2.4.0-test6 neither with pcmcia-cs-3.1.19 nor with pcmcia-cs-3.1.20. I configured linux completely without PCMCIA and made an additional installation of pcmcia-cs-3.1.xx. When I boot, "insmod /lib/modules/2.4.0-test6/pcmcia/i82365.o poll_intervall=100" in /etc/rc.d/rc.pcmcia produces:

  Intel PCIP probe:
     Bridge register mapping failed:
     check cb_mem_base setting

Are there any hints?

	Juergen 

More perhaps an answer?!

Re: Question linux-2.4.0-test6, Xircom and i82365 (Juergen Rose)
Date: 2000, Aug 16
From: Juergen Rose jrrose

Reading the thread "Bug: Lockups on card insertion/removal..." I ask me, if the same recipe could help.

cat /proc/pci gives (lspci does not work on my laptop):
...
Bus  0, device   4, function  0:
  CardBus bridge: Texas Instruments PCI1225 (rev 1).
    IRQ 11.
    Master Capable.  Latency=168.  Max Lat=4.
    Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0x10000000 [0x10000fff].
Bus  0, device   4, function  1:
  CardBus bridge: Texas Instruments PCI1225 (#2) (rev 1).
    IRQ 11.
    Master Capable.  Latency=168.  Min Gnt=192.Max Lat=7.
    Non-prefetchable 32 bit memory at 0x10001000 [0x10001fff].
...
Bus  0, device   7, function  2:
  USB Controller: Intel Corporation 82371AB PIIX4 USB (rev 1).
    IRQ 5.
    Master Capable.  Latency=64.  
    I/O at 0x1060 [0x107f].
...
Bus  0, device   8, function  0:
  Multimedia audio controller: ESS Technology ES1978 Maestro 2E (rev 16).
    IRQ 5.
    Master Capable.  Latency=64.  Min Gnt=2.Max Lat=24.
    I/O at 0x1400 [0x14ff].

dump_pirq output:
Interrupt routing table found at address 0xfdf50:
  Version 1.0, size 0x0090
  Interrupt router is device 00:07.0
  PCI exclusive interrupt mask: 0x0000
  Compatible router: vendor 0x8086 device 0x122e

Device 00:07.0 (slot 0):
  INTD: link 0x63, irq mask 0x0020

Device 00:04.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x60, irq mask 0x0800
  INTB: link 0x61, irq mask 0x0800

Device 00:08.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x63, irq mask 0x0020

Device 00:10.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x63, irq mask 0x0020
  INTB: link 0x61, irq mask 0x0800

Device 00:0d.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x61, irq mask 0x0800
  INTB: link 0x63, irq mask 0x0020

Device 00:01.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x60, irq mask 0x0800

Device 01:00.0 (slot 0):
  INTA: link 0x60, irq mask 0x0800

Interrupt router at 00:07.0: Intel 82371AB PIIX4/PIIX4E PCI-to-ISA bridge
  PIRQ1 (link 0x60): irq 11
  PIRQ2 (link 0x61): unrouted
  PIRQ3 (link 0x62): unrouted
  PIRQ4 (link 0x63): irq 5
  Serial IRQ: [enabled] [continuous] [frame=21] [pulse=4]

So it seems me that irq=5 is at the place of irq=15 at the former thread. That's why I set
	PCIC_OPTS="poll_interval=100 pci_irq_list=5"
in /etc/rc.d/rc.pcmcia and now my card is recognized.

	Juergen

None The PCI support in linux-2.4.0-test6 is broken

Re: Question linux-2.4.0-test6, Xircom and i82365 (Juergen Rose)
Date: 2000, Aug 16
From: David Hinds <dhinds@pcmcia.sourceforge.org>

Upgrade to a newer kernel and the bridge mapping problem will go away.

-- Dave

Question Install with KXL-810A external cdrom

Date: 2000, Aug 26
From: Tom Halladay Xeviousceo

I'm trying to install linux on a Z-Note Flex laptop as the only operating system, I'm using a panasonic KXL-810A cdrom, what driver am i supposed to specify as the scsi adapter in the scsi configuration? or am i doing it wrong altogether

Question PCMCIA ethernet install

Date: 2000, Aug 31
From: David Wallace <root@pmsc.com>

Hi, I have a Texas Instruments 5200 laptop. I installed
it a few years ago using Caldera 1.3 via NFS PCMCIA ethernet
card, an IBM ethernet credit card adapter. Lately I have
been trying to install RedHat 6.2. The laptop has a pci
docking port, which creates a peer discovery loop unless
the boot param "pci=nopeer" or pci="nobios" is used. When
these param's are used, the install hangs at a blue screen
stating "...PC Card services". I am probably going to re-
partition the drive and do a hard-drive install, but decided
to post here just to see if someone had a solution or possible
solution. Here is the Caldera info which works at this time:
From dmesg:
Card services 3.0.3 Kernel 2.0.35
Cirrus PD672x at port 0x3e0 ofs 0x00 2 sockets
A hard-drive is a lot of noise, and I'll admit I'm lazy,
the net install is a lot easier.

Regards,

David "hope to find an easy solution" Wallace
Installing Linux using or onto a PCMCIA device


Add Message to: "Installing Linux using or onto a PCMCIA device"

Members Subscribe Admin Mode Show Frames Help for HyperNews at pcmcia-cs.sourceforge.net 1.10